Tag Archives: Clyde McPhatter

A new era dawns

Rock ‘n’ roll music in America was undergoing a significant change as the ’60s dawned. The original rock stars were in taters. Chuck Berry was battling underage sex charges in relation to the Mann Act. Jerry Lee Lewis was dealing with the fallout from marrying his teenage cousin. Elvis Presley was just finishing up a stint in the military and Little Richard turned his eye to preaching. Those that may have ignited the next wave of American rock music – notably Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens – perished in a plane crash in early 1959. In the radio realm, a huge payola scandal ended the career of pioneering DJ Alan Freed.

So what did American teens turn to? Vocal groups, teen idols, doo-wopers and instrumentals. All of that was evident when Frankie Avalon headlined a pair of shows on January 29, 1960 at the Stambaugh Auditorium. Also filling out the roster were Clyde McPhatter, Bobby Rydell, Johnny and the Hurricanes, The Crests, Freddy Cannon, Sammy Turner, The Isley Brothers, Linda Laurie, The Clovers and Cliff Richard.

Note: A reader named David sent me a color copy of the poster earlier in July. Sorry for the delay in posting it, but it looks good!

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

Fats Domino and a hit parade of stars

Fats Domino was a pretty big star already by the time he arrived for a pair of shows on February 17, 1957 at the Stambaugh Auditorium. The future Rock ‘N’ Roll Hall of Famer had a mess of hits from the R&B and pop charts to draw from including “Blueberry Hill”, “Ain’t That A Shame” and “I’m Walkin'”. He also had performed in such films as Shake, Rattle and Rock and The Girl Can’t Help It. Bill Doggett was second on the bill and he was famous at the time for his hit “Honky Tonk” which reached No. 2 on the pop charts in 1956. Clyde McPhatter, also a future Rock ‘N’ Roll Hall of Famer, was seemingly a regular on these sorts of shows in the late ’50s. LaVern Baker, the second female inducted into the Rock ‘N’ Roll Hall of Fame, was coming off a huge hit in “Jim Dandy” in 1956. It’s hard to believe that Chuck Berry would get booted down the list so far, but in Feb. of 1957 he still only had one huge pop chart topper to his name in “Maybellene”. Berry’s “School Day” released the next month was a bigger single on the pop charts and would propel him into a really strong year or two into the end of the decade.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Stars align in 1956

Rock ‘n’ roll fever was in full bloom in Youngstown on October 25, 1956 when a show full of superstars from the era arrived to play what was billed as “The Show of ’56” at the Stambaugh Auditorium. On the top of the bill was Bill Haley and and The Comets along with The Platters. Whoever was designing the advertisement at the time was not using the groups most well-known songs to promote the show. The Comets’ “Rock Around The Clock” was more than 2 years old at this time and more than a year removed from topping the Billboard pop charts. Instead it was “See You Later Alligator” featured in the 1956 film Rock Around The Clock which was used as a hook to draw teens in. The Platters’ hit “Only You” was more than a year old at this point. Here there’s a push for “Magic Touch and “My Prayer”.

Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers were pushing the Top 10 hit “Why Do Fools Fall In Love” released in April of ’56. Other doo-wop stars on the bill included Clyde McPhatter and The Clovers. Rocker Chuck Berry, back for yet another performance in Youngstown, was fairly low on the bill. His single “Roll Over Beethoven” peaked at No. 29 on the Billboard charts in June.

WHAT THE SHOW SOUNDED LIKE: Here’s The Comets on TV in 1956 performing their signature hit.

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,